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5 takeaways from Victoria’s 2022 Vital Signs report

While there is much to celebrate, there’s plenty of work to be done
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Greater Victoria’s overall grade is up, but there’s still work to be done.

From our vibrant parks to the natural outdoors, there are many things to be proud of in Greater Victoria. Released this month, Victoria’s 2022 Vital Signs report shows that while there is much to celebrate, there’s plenty of work to be done to foster a vibrant, caring community for all.

Greater Victoria’s overall grade is up, but there’s work to be done

When asked to rate their quality of life in Greater Victoria, citizen survey respondents gave an average grade of B+, up from a B the year prior. While this may spark optimism, many areas in the community need attention. Five issue areas saw letter grades change, with four seeing their grades drop. These included: Economy, Health & Wellness, Housing and Transportation.

Housing receives the first failing grade in Victoria’s Vital Signs history

For the first time in 17 years, an issue area received a failing grade in Victoria’s Vital Signs report, going to Housing. To many Greater Victorians, it comes as no surprise. As highlighted in the May real estate statistics in the report, median sale prices were 1.25 million for a single-family home, up from the previous year. The median sale prices of condos and townhomes also continued to climb. While home prices rise, so does the cost of renting, putting pressure on many residents of Greater Victoria.

There’s plenty to be proud of in the capital region

While issue areas like housing and cost of living demand immediate action, there are areas to celebrate. According to survey respondents, the top three best things about our region were the natural environment, climate and parks. Learning and Sports and Recreation each received a letter grade of B+, while Arts & Culture received a B. The generosity of Greater Victoria should be lauded, with 50% of survey respondents noting they are active volunteers. The median donation (2020) in Greater Victoria rose to $500, well above the national median donation of $340.

Vital Signs provides a snapshot while the Data Hub evolves

Alongside the report, the Vital Victoria digital platform, Greater Victoria’s Data Hub, continues to grow and provide year-round data. Launched in 2021, there are now 75 indicators featured on the data hub across ten issue areas, offering detailed analysis of quality of life in Greater Victoria.

The data hub also includes this year’s feature article, which dives into the meaning of community. Three leaders in the community (Dr. Grace Wong Sneddon, Patrick Kelly and Carly Milloy) reflect on what community means to them.

Vital Signs reminds us that small steps can make big change

While it’s easy to think an issue is too big for one person, the Vital Signs report is a reminder that small changes from an individual can create momentum across a region. Large issues, like housing, require teamwork, which starts with individuals taking small steps that can collectively lead to large change.

The capital region is a community that comes together to find solutions, and Victoria’s 2022 Vital Signs report is a reminder that when voices are brought together, change can be made for the better. Pick up your copy of Victoria’s Vital Signs today.

 
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