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Flashing bike lights a hazard if too bright

Re: “Bikes should not have strobing white lights,” letter, Nov. 9. My husband was recently completely blinded when driving through the intersection of Shelbourne and Hillside, and prayed he would not cause an accident. Why? A flashing bike light.

Re: “Bikes should not have strobing white lights,” letter, Nov. 9.

My husband was recently completely blinded when driving through the intersection of Shelbourne and Hillside, and prayed he would not cause an accident. Why? A flashing bike light.

On Pembroke Street, my husband had to pull over; our neighbour, in a car behind us, also pulled over.

Both got out to tell the cyclist his flashing lights had blinded them. He was gracious and open to the feedback, and said: “Oh, that must be why people were flashing their headlights at me.”

I get migraines. A flashing, strobing bike light hitting the side of my eye can blind me for a moment and make me very sick for three days. In all these examples, the cyclist’s attempt at personal safety creates more danger for the cyclist, drivers and pedestrians.

Cyclist visibility through effective lighting is important, but the light should not be flashing. That communal safety guideline is supported by the B.C. Motor Vehicle Act, which says bikes should have a regular light on the front. Flashing red is allowed on the back.

Elizabeth Monk

Victoria