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1,200-kilometre Race to Alaska is off and running — with no engines

Competitors made the traditional sprint from Government Street to their vessels in the Inner Harbour on Thursday and set out to complete the 1,200-kilometre journey.

Competitors in the Race to Alaska got off to a fast start Thursday for the second phase of the event, which will take them all the way to Ketchikan if they’re lucky enough to finish.

No engines are allowed in the race, which only 19 of 41 entrants managed to complete in 2022.

This year, two entrants were unable to complete the first leg, from Port Townsend, Washington, to Victoria, bringing the field down to 29.

The remaining competitors made the traditional sprint from Government Street to their vessels at the docks below and set out to complete the 1,200-kilometre journey.

First prize is $10,000 and second prize is a set of steak knives. Follow the racers’ progress at r2ak.com.

jbell@timescolonist.com